Portrait everything

By Hockney - The smoker of blue eyes

By Hockney – The smoker of blue eyes

By Cézanne - Portrait of Armand seated wearing hat and neck scarf

By Cézanne – Portrait of Armand seated wearing hat and neck scarf

By Saura, Antonio - Unknown title

By Saura, Antonio – Unknown title

By Gris, J. - Preparatory sketch for a portrait of Germaine Raynal

By Gris, J. – Preparatory sketch for a portrait of Germaine Raynal

By R.B. Kitaj - Portrait of old Degas

By R.B. Kitaj – Portrait of old Degas

By Casas, R. - La Frotinne

By Casas, R. – La Frotinne

By Carracci - Portrait of the gentleman with a big moustache

By Carracci – Portrait of the gentleman with a big moustache

By Dufy, R. - Seafaring woman

By Dufy, R. – Seafaring woman

By Marini, Marino - Portrait of Giorgio Morandi

By Marini, Marino – Portrait of Giorgio Morandi

By Manet - Isabelle Lemonnier

By Manet – Isabelle Lemonnier

By Moholy Nagy, L. - Unknown title

By Moholy Nagy, L. – Unknown title

By Degas - Rosa posing standing and pensive

By Degas – Rosa posing standing and pensive

By Michelangelo - Portrait of Andrea Quaratesi

By Michelangelo – Portrait of Andrea Quaratesi

By Titian - Portrait of a young woman

By Titian – Portrait of a young woman

By Modigliani - Portrait of Solá

By Modigliani – Portrait of Solá

By Clouet, Jean  - Portrait of a bearded marshal

By Clouet, Jean – Portrait of a bearded marshal

By Picasso - Miss Walter

By Picasso – Miss Walter

By Beck, L. - A portrait of a gentleman of 16th century

By Beck, L. – A portrait of a gentleman of 16th century

By Balthus - Untitled

By Balthus – Untitled

By Menzel - Portrait of a politician of his time

By Menzel – Portrait of a politician of his time

By Ingres - Mrs Baltard and her daughter Paule

By Ingres – Mrs Baltard and her daughter Paule

By Rubens - Portrait of Hélène the second wife of artist

By Rubens – Portrait of Hélène the second wife of artist

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6 Comments

Filed under portrait everything

6 responses to “Portrait everything

  1. This is a great post 🙂 I love to see all the different approaches to drawing a portrait.

    • Oh, thanks a lot. You just remembered the true goal of this blog, namely spreading the wish to sketch, motivated from a virtual travel through the different ways to do of each one. See you soon!

  2. Thank you for this amazing compilation of drawings. It is so interesting to see how different the painters created the portraits. My favorite is the sketch by Menzel.
    Wishing you a very happy new year, dear Sketchuniverse 🙂
    XOXO Julia

    • Hi Julia, first of all, thanks for your patience. I would learn to respond faster. I’m proud to receive your opinion and the time you spent with the remark.
      I think that to prefer the Menzel’s work is to wager for an author with detailed sighting but with quick drawing, perhaps you have seen the lines that are joining to the bow tie. His way to solve is based in his dexterity in continuous evolution as the same way as the handwriting. Maybe you have realized about some details I’m not commenting. This piece of art let us see the sketch under colour.
      This kind of comments are the reason of this blog, without them nothing would make sense.
      Oh yes, happy new year, I’m sure it will be. Thanks a lot. >< o

  3. What a wonderful selection! Thank you. It is so much about what the artist chooses to leave out, isn’t it.
    I particularly love the Manet.
    What do you reckon to the sketches of Holbein (the Younger)?

    • Hi Francesca. First of all I want to excuse the delay of this answer.

      And after to say about Manet’s work, I guess this piece (Isabelle Lemonnier) it’s a work made with a lot of little touchs of paintbrush, at the same time playing with the minimum and the maximum of the pressure of this tool, its upright (if you test you could get some similar result).

      I would like to answer you, best than I could, but art can not be explained as a science. In my opinion the line of Holbein the Younger seeks close forms, closed areas and they build the work: a build of shapes and areas distinguishing the two dimensions of a composition. A paradigm Could Be Matisse.

      The opposite would be a line exploring the third dimension. An endoscopic and wandering line always deeping through space careless about closing forms. A paradigm could be Rembrandt.

      But care, there is almost an infinite ways between this two. That’s the art of Drawing and Sketching

      Maybe your comment and your ask, were the best I never had. You’re a true artist. Thanks a lot, and see you soon.

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