After title of the plays. The Love and the Death

Dear followers and friends, today here are some sketches, drawings, engravings, illustrations… (don’t matter how we could call them) made after title of plays: theatre, literature, movies, musicals, TV series, etc. The 8th picture is an sketch by Munch. Maybe someday I will classify each author with his most important topic, and Edvard had a life determined by deep feelings about the LOVE AND THE DEATH and this is obvious  if we realize the details on his works. So, this artist made some sketches like ‘Carrion’ (dead rotten flesh) after a poem by Baudelaire, that was really awesome. Definitely THE LOVE AND THE DEATH, and these extreme sensations when they are mixed achieve a deep passion.

So, about this thought, I just want to suggest a great song ‘My skin’, composed after a real narration of a woman that realizes that her couple can’t make love with her because she is dying.

'My skin' song(Album Ophelia) by Natalie MerchantAlso a dreadful and great film ‘Amour’ (maybe the best of my last ten years of cinema) about their late and deep love between an old couple.

'Amour' the film by Michael HanekeAnd finally about the 12th picture, the sketch by Blake, Quentin, I linked some frivolous but delicious pictures about a literature play fitted for TV ‘Brideshead Revisited’ (perhaps this language was promoted with the lushness of british works).

BR 1BR 2BR 3

 

 

 

Well folks, I admire your sensitivity that always you displayed like exquisite beholders. Thanks for your visit and enjoy!

Here are the sketches

By Petrov-Vodkin - Sketch for the play 'The Karamazov Brothers' wrote by Dostoevsky

By Petrov-Vodkin – Sketch for the play ‘The Karamazov Brothers’ wrote by Dostoyevski

By Daumier - Don Quixote and Sancho Panza trotting. The characters by Cervantes in 'El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha'

By Daumier – Don Quixote and Sancho Panza trotting. The characters by Cervantes in ‘El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha’

By Delacroix - Scene depicting the devil with Dante under the appeal of the alluring canto in his work 'The Divine Comedy'

By Delacroix – Scene depicting the devil with Dante under the appeal of the alluring canto in his work ‘The Divine Comedy’

By Matisse - Scene of Ulysses overcoming Polyphemus the cyclop, blinding the unique eye of the giant. Drawing from James Joyce's 'Ulysses'

By Matisse – Scene of Ulysses overcoming Polyphemus the cyclop, blinding the unique eye of the giant. Drawing from James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses’

By Quagli, Giuseppe - The cemetery where Don Juan hears the voice from beyond the grave. The Mozart's opera 'Don Giovanni'

By Quagli, Giuseppe – The cemetery where Don Juan hears the voice from beyond the grave. The Mozart’s opera ‘Don Giovanni’

By Thomson, Hugh - Scene in a parlor. From 'Pride and Prejudice' by Jane Austen

By Thomson, Hugh – Scene in a parlor. From ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen

By Blake, William - Lear and Cordelia in prison. 'King Lear' by Shakespeare

By Blake, William – Lear and Cordelia in prison. ‘King Lear’ by Shakespeare

By Munch - A carrion. 'Une charogne' Sketch for 'Les Fleurs du Mal' by Charles Baudelaire

By Munch – A carrion. ‘Une charogne’ Sketch for ‘Les Fleurs du Mal’ by Charles Baudelaire

By Zichy, Mihály - Scene about 'Hamlet' by Shakespeare

By Zichy, Mihály – Scene about ‘Hamlet’ by Shakespeare

By Dalí - Don Quixote standing and Sancho riding his ass. 'El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha' by Cervantes

By Dalí – Don Quixote standing and Sancho riding his ass. ‘El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha’ by Cervantes

By Bakst, Leon Nikolayevich - Illustration for the ballet 'The Firebird' by Igor Stravinsky

By Bakst, Leon Nikolayevich – Illustration for the ballet ‘The Firebird’ by Igor Stravinsky

By Blake, Quentin - Aloysius, the teddy bear, observed by Sebastian and Charles. 'Brideshead Revisited' by Evelyn Waugh

By Blake, Quentin – Aloysius, the teddy bear, observed by Sebastian and Charles. ‘Brideshead Revisited’ by Evelyn Waugh

By Beardsley, Aubrey - The floral motif illustration for 'Salome' by Oscar Wilde

By Beardsley, Aubrey – The floral motif illustration for ‘Salome’ by Oscar Wilde

By Cardi, Ludovico - Lucifer. 'The Divine Comedy' by Dante Alighieri

By Cardi, Ludovico – Lucifer. ‘The Divine Comedy’ by Dante Alighieri

Advertisements

10 Comments

Filed under mythology allegoric literary biblical and religious

10 responses to “After title of the plays. The Love and the Death

  1. These sketches are Fantastic! Dali’s Quixotte is awesome, did I see it before?? I don’t think so! It is exceptional!
    Daumier was such a great artist. I remember I used to watch his work long ago. And L.N. Baskt and his drawings of the Russian ballets, i love them all. Fantatisc choices dear friend!

    • So true Carmen, these whirlpools depicted an special character and if Miguel the writer, he could see them, perhaps he would give his approval to this crazy but genuine and innovative drawing.
      Yes, I always remembered that you love Daumier. This who inspired the Disney’s sketches.
      Leon Bakst is an example about the idea of Whole Art, and reciprocal actions, between costumes, music, painting, architecture, literature, etc. that happened in Russia with the jump of 19th century towards the begin of 20th. These artists still now are inspiring the current arts. The western graphical design during some decades was copying the russian masters, but the most mass media are interested to forgetting this. Also Picasso made a lot of drawings with Bakst’s style. Thanks so much for your opinion here is so appraised. Best wishes ❤

  2. I can’t believe it!!

    My skin is the most beautiful song in the world! And I’m sure that you know it very well hahaha. It has a sad history, maybe wherefore the song is so brilliant…

    The selection of pictures are simply perfect and my favourite is the last, Lucifer 🙂

    My best whishes!

    • Oh dearest Sara, your comment is the true 🎁gift of my day. I’m simply happy when you stopping by and let your opinion but specially in this post of the song that you learned me, your favourite. It is a little amazing that you choosed👺 Lucifer but I will 👓check this work accurately to share your choice. Thanks a lot 📶💟

  3. These sketches bring alive literary pieces. Superb!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s